Do You Know the Purpose of a Resume?

Do you really understand the purpose of a resume?  Its only purpose is to get you an interview.  However, most managers only spend an average of 30 seconds on each and every resume.  The key to an effective resume is to be brief, but with “hard-hitting” content that makes the reader want to call you in for the interview. To get noticed, your resume needs to “bring out” your best.  You need to write the resume with the following in mind:

  • Challenges
    • Where were you challenged with at your job?
  • Actions
    • What actions did you take to support the challenge?
  • Results
    • What were the results expressed in numbers, percentages, savings, and cost avoidance?

Here is an example:

  • Before: Initiated a learning technology effort to fix the identified deficiencies.
  • After: Initiated a $30M advanced learning technology effort to fix the identified deficiencies and achieved a return on investment in less than three years.

 

Can you see the difference?  Which statement would you rather see in your resume?

 

The Before statement doesn’t portray anything about your knowledge, skills or abilities.

 

The After statement providers the hiring manager with an idea of the dollar amount of your program and how long it took you to achieve an excellent ROI.

 

Remember, hiring managers evaluate each candidate on their past performance. In order to measure your past performance you need to state the challenges you faced, how you handled them and the end results. The hiring manager is then able to make a better determination if you are a good fit for their company.

 

Do you Know the Purpose of Your Resume?

Do you really understand the purpose of a resume?  Its only purpose is to get you an interview.  However, most managers only spend an average of 30 seconds on each and every resume.  The key to an effective resume is to be brief, but with “hard-hitting” content that makes the reader want to call you in for the interview. To get noticed, your resume needs to “bring out” your best.  You need to write the resume with the following in mind:

Challenges

Where were you challenged with at your job?

Actions

What actions did you take to support the challenge?

Results

What were the results expressed in numbers, percentages, savings, and cost avoidance?

Here is an example:

Before: Initiated a learning technology effort to fix the identified deficiencies.

After: Initiated a $30M advanced learning technology effort to fix the identified deficiencies and achieved a return on investment in less than three years.

Can you see the difference?  Which statement would you rather see in your resume?

The Before statement doesn’t portray anything about your knowledge, skills or abilities.  It’s more in line with a job description.

The After statement providers the hiring manager with an idea of the dollar amount of your program and how long it took you to achieve an excellent ROI. Bottom line:  What you are capable of doing for their company.

Remember, hiring managers evaluate each candidate on their past performance. In order to measure your past performance you need to state the challenges you faced, how you handled them and the end results. The hiring manager is then able to make a better determination if you are a good fit for their company.

Don’t have the time to create a professional resume, contact JumpStart Resumes for a consultation today!

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